Crawley

Advanced Search

Main Menu

or browse by theme

  

Crawley Borough Council

Report No: CPU38

1

Report to Overview and Scrutiny Commission

9th June 2008

Report to Cabinet

11th June 2008

West Sussex County Council

Local Area Agreement (LAA2) 2008/11

1. Key Points

1.1 This report is for the Cabinet to note, comment upon and give their support to the second West Sussex Local Area Agreement (LAA2). It commits the Council to working in partnership with a range of stakeholders to deliver a number of agreed National Indicators that relate directly to the Council’s role and responsibilities. These indicators are listed in the Appendix A. The Cabinet is requested to delegate to the Chief Executive, in consultation with the Leader of the Council, authority to agree any necessary minor amendments or modifications to the final agreement.

2. Recommendations

2.1 To the Overview and Scrutiny Commission

That the Commission consider the report and decide what comments, if any it wishes to submit to the Cabinet.

2.2 To The Cabinet

That the Cabinet note, comment upon and give their support to the second West Sussex Local Area Agreement.

That the Cabinet delegate to the Chief Executive, in consultation with the Leader of the Council, authority to agree any necessary minor amendments or modifications to the final agreement

CARRIE BURTON

Corporate Policy Manager

3. Background

3.1 On 5th March, the Secretary of State made a formal Direction under section 106 of the Local Government and Public Involvement in Health Act 2007, directing West Sussex County Council to prepare and submit a draft Local Area Agreement for West Sussex on or before 30 May 2008.

3.2 The Local Area Agreement (LAA) is a contract between central and local government.  The first LAA was published in April 2006 and is due to expire at the end of March 2009.  Crawley Borough Council benefited directly from the first LAA with significant funding for health and well being and community safety. West Sussex County Council has been working with partners to establish priorities for the second LAA (LAA2) to be agreed and take effect from June 2008.

3.3 The core of LAA2 will be a set of no more than 35 improvement targets, together with 16 statutory educational and early years’ targets to be worked towards between 2008 and 2011.  These targets will be drawn from a new set of 198 National Indicators, which were published by the government on 10 October 2007.   

3.4 West Sussex County Council has lead the process of negotiating up to 35 indicators, based on local partners' assessment of priorities and advice on national priorities from the Government Office for the South East (GOSE).   

3.5 LAA2 will help to deliver the objectives of the West Sussex Sustainable Community Strategy and, as with the first LAA, will be overseen by the Public Service Board. 

3.6 The Public Service Board considered a selection of indicators for the second Local Area Agreement (LAA2) at a meeting on 25th February and there have since been discussions with GOSE and Government Departments about indicators that the Government wishes to be included.

3.7 Targets have been proposed in the latest draft of the LAA2, however some targets could not be set by the submission date of 30th May and some may change as negotiations are finalised.

4. West Sussex Local Area Agreement 2008/11 Priorities.

4.1 Based on existing County, District and Borough Sustainable Community Strategies, public surveys, views of representation groups/organisations and the analysis of the county’s needs, the priorities for the LAA2 are:

a) to level up the life outcomes and experiences for those in rural and deprived communities in housing, crime, health and employment;

b) to increase the sustainable accessibility of jobs, education and essential services to all, particularly in rural areas and for those in deprived communities;

c) to improve the health, educational attainment and access to activities of children and younger people in all communities.

5. Ward Members' Views

5.1. The recommendations are not ward-specific

6. Staffing, Financial and Legal Implications/Powers

6.1 There are no direct staff implications arising from this report

6.2 Achievement of the LAA2 targets will be funded with existing resources of the partners.

6.3 The Comprehensive Spending Review announced Performance Reward Grant for the new LAAs to maintain effective incentives for partnerships to deliver ambitious LAAs. Final guidance will be published as part of the first annual review of the new LAAs. However one of the key principles will be reward paid in relation to average performance across the up to 35 targets agreed. There will be a minimum average level of performance which all partnerships will need to reach before any reward is payable to the lead Authority. All of the reward on offer will be payable if all targets have been achieved.

6.4 The Council is statutorily bound to have regard for those targets within the LAA2 which relate to the Council i.e. targets for the indicators where District and Borough Councils are listed as Statutory Partners. See Appendix A.

7. Links to the Sustainable Community Strategy and Corporate Plan

The proposals contained in this report relate to the following key areas of the Sustainable Community Strategy

Community Cohesion y Community Safety y

Young People and Children y Health and Well Being y

Older People y The Environment y

The Local Economy y Social Inclusion y

The following key principles are applicable:-

(i) Working together y

(ii) Dignity, respect and opportunities for all y

(iii) Involving People y

(iv) Making it last y

The report relates to the following areas in which the Council operates to enhance the town and the quality of life of local people:-

(i) Our Communities: (ensuring they are safe, healthy, y

cohesive and enjoyable)

(ii) Our Environment: (ensuring that it is attractive, clean, y

protected and sustainable)

(iii) Our Economy: (ensuring it is thriving, vibrant and y

prosperous)

(iv) Our Council: (ensuring it is engaging, transparent, y

business-like with a social conscience, cost-effective

and a place-shaping community leader)

8. Reasons For The Recommendations

8.1 The Council is statutorily bound to have regard for those targets within the LAA2 which relate to the Council i.e. targets for the indicators where District and Borough Councils are listed as Statutory Partners. When Comprehensive Area Assessment is introduced from April 2009 we will be judged on our engagement in and delivery of the second Local Area Agreement, so it is crucial that we give our support to the new LAA2 2008/11.

9. Background Papers

West Sussex Local Area Agreement LAA2 2008/11, document attached at Appendix A.

Contact Officer:- Carrie Burton, Corporate Policy Manager

Direct Line:- 01293 438473

Appendix A

A Local Area Agreement

for West Sussex

2008 – 2011

Preamble to be provided by Government?

Signed:


For West Sussex County Council For Her Majesty’s Government

and West Sussex Strategic

Partnership

………………………………… ………………………………………………

Henry Smith

Leader, West Sussex County Council

Chairman, West Sussex Strategic

Partnership

WEST SUSSEX LOCAL AREA AGREEMENT 2008 – 2011

WEST SUSSEX PERSPECTIVE

COVERING MEMORANDUM

The Local Government and Public Involvement in Health Act 2007 requires responsible authorities to have regard to their Sustainable Community Strategy (SCS) when preparing the LAA, and draft Government guidance sees LAAs as the shorter-term delivery mechanism for the SCS

At present the County and Borough and District Councils and their partners are reviewing the county wide and district level SCSs through the Local Strategic Partnerships. The new SCSs will be informed by the new LAA and will in turn create a composite policy framework that will help to deliver a better quality of life for all West Sussex residents through partnership working at the local and strategic levels. The importance of an integrated suite of SCSs and their relationship to the LAA and future Comprehensive Area Assessments is recognised by the West Sussex Public Service Board.

Therefore, the drafting of priorities, indicators and targets for the West Sussex LAA, which is to be approved in 2008, is provisional, to be reconsidered when revision of the SCS is complete.

THE WEST SUSSEX PERSPECTIVE

West Sussex is home to some 770,000 people and is the 10th most populous local authority area in England. Millions more people visit the county each year, including to the South Downs AONB, the coast, Goodwood, Chichester Festival Theatre, and many other attractions (which contribute also to a generally high quality of life for residents). The county hosts Gatwick Airport, the world’s busiest single runway airport, with 35m passengers per year travelling to 200 destinations. The coast features a number of ports and harbours including Chichester, Littlehampton and Shoreham. It is one of the most developed coastlines in the UK.

There are significant flows into and out of the County for work. These travel to work patterns not only impact on transport issues, but the outflow of highly skilled higher earners has implications for the local economy.

Statistics only ever tell part of the story, but some of the more striking figures for West Sussex are:-

Deprivation – Increasing, especially in Adur: All districts in West Sussex, except Mid Sussex, have become relatively more deprived over the last three years according to the Index of Multiple Deprivation 2007. Adur has had the 3rd largest fall in the deprivation rankings of all 354 local authority areas in England. On the Index of Multiple Deprivation 2004 no area within Adur District was ranked within the most deprived 20% in England; in 2007 14% of Adur was ranked in the lowest 20%.

Employment – challenges of differentials and house prices: Unemployment is low in West Sussex at 1.1%. However, the proportion of long term unemployed, that is people who have been out of work for over a year, is significant, particularly in Worthing and Arun where it is over 15%

The proportion of working population whose qualifications are below NVQ level 2 in Adur, Arun and Crawley is well above the national average. This is reflected in the high proportion of working aged residents, particularly those living in Crawley and Arun who are in low skilled occupations.

There are marked differences in average earnings across the county. In the north east (Crawley, Horsham, Mid Sussex) average weekly earnings of residents are £514, compared with £428 in the four coastal districts (Adur, Arun, Chichester, Worthing). Differences in household incomes are even starker at £811 in the Gatwick Diamond (includes part of Surrey) and £542 in Coastal West Sussex.

House prices and levels of earnings and incomes have important consequences for affordability in the county. House prices in West Sussex are significantly above the national average, at £234,200 in 2007 according to the Land Registry. This, coupled with lower than average earnings, means that West Sussex is one of the least affordable parts of the country to buy an house. For 2007 the overall West Sussex median income to median house price ratio was 9.76, rising to 12.1 in Chichester.

There are approximately 26,000 people on Incapacity Benefit.

Education – Could do better: GCSE 5+ A* - C including English and Maths - 49% in 2007, above the national average of 46.7% but just below our statistical neighbours’ average of 49.45%. There are some marked variations across the county, with the highest attaining school at 76% and the lowest 23%. In Adur, only 25.9% attained 5+ A* - C including English and Maths.

Crime – Downward trend: The West Sussex rate of recorded BCS comparator crime was low at 44/1000 population in 2006/7, compared with 61/1000 for England and Wales. There were 33,703 BCS comparator crimes in 2006/7, and 15,976 for the first two quarters of 2007/8. The statistics show a continuing downward trend in overall crime.

According to the Triennial Household Survey, 45% of people in 2006 feel fairly or very safe after dark, which has increased from 38% in 2003. 86% feel fairly or very safe when outside by day, up from 83% in 2003.

Ethnicity: From the 2001 Census 15.5% of the population of Crawley were from BEM (not white British) groups, far higher than regional and national averages and 6.5% in West Sussex as a whole; recent data from ONS indicates that these proportions have risen to almost 18% and 9%. Data from the Workers Registration Scheme shows that over 8,100 migrants from EU Accession states were registered between March 2004 and March 2007 in West Sussex, around 40% of them in Arun District alone.

Community Cohesion: The emergence of new migrant workers into West Sussex presents the county with a number of strategic ‘risks’ to community cohesion and sustainability. Equally such workers and their families bring a number of opportunities with the arrival of individuals with much needed skills and capacity and elements of cultural diversity, which are to be embraced and welcomed. However, proper integration is necessary to mitigate the risks and harness the potential opportunities for the benefit of all. The Commission for Integration and Cohesion final report "Our Shared Future" showed Arun and Crawley to be within the 20% least cohesive areas in the country in terms of perceptions “whether the local area is a place where people from different backgrounds get on well’

Life in West Sussex now…

Over half of the County is recognised as being of outstanding natural beauty, and the overall environment is generally regarded as excellent, with access to countryside and coast, contributing to a high quality of life for many. In rural areas relative deprivation and access to services are difficult and often concealed issues. High levels of road use, and a generally good standard of living result in high energy demands and resultant CO2 emissions. Increasingly high summer temperatures and the demand from new development exacerbate pressures on water resources that are scarce in places. Parts of the coast and low-lying flood plains are of national and international importance for conservation and recreation, but are also vulnerable to sea level rise and the vagaries of climate change.

People on the whole like living in West Sussex, with its varied landscape, strong heritage and diverse cultural and leisure opportunities. Population turnover is relatively low and it remains a very popular retirement destination. Over two thirds of the population believe it is a place where people from different backgrounds get on well together. There are many hundreds of community groups of all ages and interests.

…and in the future

But the future for West Sussex may not look as good as the present. Pressures are increasing in every direction - housing, transport, the ageing population, demands on the environment, climate change issues – and sustaining a prosperous economy providing decent jobs under global competition. It is essential that the public services in West Sussex work together to ensure a bright future for everyone and every community, which builds on the successful inheritance of the county.

Public Services in West Sussex:

A story of lack of government investment…

West Sussex residents and its local authorities and public services have fared particularly badly in recent years in terms of government investment. This will continue in the next three years of this LAA, alongside the three years of the Comprehensive Spending Review. This is most apparent in that

  • the County Council will continue to receive the absolute minimum grant increase for the 3 years, well below inflation, and is now probably the poorest funded county in England. This will significantly reduce the investment which can be made in key services such as transport, adult social care, and children’s services. Targets for improvement in these services will be severely constrained by the government’s decisions to provide so little funding to West Sussex residents;
  • the borough and districts councils do not fare any better: All seven Districts in West Sussex are in receipt of only a minimum grant floor increase in 2008/09 of just 1%. Four of the seven receive a minimum increase for all three years of the settlement.
  • West Sussex PCT has been shown by an independent academic report to be underfunded by some £42 million a year through the government’s grant formula. This will prevent rapid progress in closing health inequalities in the county;
  • investment in transport has been poor for many years, most notably on the A27 which business has long identified as the most important block to rapid economic development. Progress on economic growth and increased prosperity for all will be impeded as long as the government does not provide the essential investment in the A27.

By comparison with these problems, in the next three years a similar county such as Somerset will gain 25% increase in funding while West Sussex gains less than 6%. This means public services cannot improve as fast for residents in West Sussex no matter how well the public agencies perform.

,,, but increasing efficiency

  • Local authorities have been achieving very high levels of efficiency savings in recent years to partly compensate for this lack of funding. The County Council has embarked on a Fundamental Service Review, which has achieved ongoing efficiency improvements of £15m in 2007/08 and a further £15m in 2008/09, with a target for a further £25 –30m over the following two years. Savings have been delivered from areas including back office functions, reduced management and administration posts, and procurement.
  • The eight local authorities have collectively overachieved compared with the efficiency targets set by Government.
  • Pilot areas of joint working between the County and Districts are going ahead as a means of promoting maximum efficiency between the two tiers of local government.
  • Two of the County’s district authorities (Adur and Worthing) are combining a significant part of their officer structure into a shared service arrangement in order to save money. Other examples are CenSus (Adur, Horsham and Mid Sussex) - the first and most successful shared services partnership in the County, and Sussex Building Control - which provides services in Horsham and Crawley.

The Geography of West Sussex:

There are marked variations within the county and we need to work together to raise expectations and meet the diverse needs in its different parts, for instance reducing health inequalities, closing gaps in educational achievement, increasing employment opportunities to minimise the number of families on low incomes and enable better access to a broad range of public services for all people in local communities.

The Rural Area

The largest part of the County comprises attractive, farmed countryside, a large part of which is designated AONB and is of national landscape importance. The County is the second most wooded in the UK – 19% woodland (national average 9%). 70% of the county’s water supply comes from underground sources, and although the rate of use is decreasing the trend is still up, adding significant pressures, particularly in a changing climate. Approximately 25% of the total County population lives in the rural area, where villages and market towns are generally prosperous many of which remain relatively unchanged. But low pay is a feature of the rural economy and for some individual households, especially those without a car, there are difficulties of access to services and other aspects of deprivation. Rural concerns include the viability of the farming industry and lack of affordable housing.

The population is a very eclectic mixture of long time residents, new incomers with jobs in London, and West Sussex families who have moved from the larger towns. Providing services to this wide range of people is challenging. Public transport is often very much needed by a few but, in many places, lacks a critical mass to make it commercially viable. Alternatives such as demand-responsive services or community buses can provide life-lines but are expensive to maintain. The relatively small size of many settlements makes locating services close to communities costly.

However, many of these communities retain a strong sense of local identity and independence and a commitment to sustain and improve life for the whole community. Helping communities to make this a success might be the greatest challenge for partners in the rural area.

The Coastal Towns

The coastal conurbation is in need of economic regeneration. There has been a long term cycle of poor investment and in some ways underachievement. Education standards, the skills levels of many available jobs, and the quality of the built environment are all below the levels which perhaps should be achieved in a relatively wealthy county. The legacy of the seaside holiday tradition remains, whilst the economy has diversified but insufficiently to maintain incomes, and low pay is a marked feature of the economy.

Economic development has been supported by public programmes, for example via the Coastal West Sussex Partnership (funded by SEEDA as the Area Investment Framework) but this funding stream will be halted in 2008/09. With the government reducing Local Authority Business Growth Incentive funding by 85% over the next 3 years, the prospects for public sector economic development intervention to address the differences in prosperity in towns along the coast to other areas have clearly been blighted.

The failure over many years to secure investment in the A27 will continue to be the largest single barrier to economic development and closing the gap on social exclusion on the coast.

Sea level rise and increased storminess associated with climate change are also challenges.

New jobs are greatly needed, particularly in higher value added activity, backed by Government investment in educational institutions to develop the skills of the existing and future workforce. Changing aspirations to encourage everyone in every community to want better, and to work towards it, may be the biggest challenge for partners in the coastal area.

The Gatwick Diamond

The Gatwick Diamond is a buoyant economic area that is not achieving its full potential because of government underfunding in infrastructure, which prevents additional development. It includes the towns of Horsham and Mid Sussex as well as Crawley (and Horley, Dorking and Redhill/Reigate in Surrey). Situated between London and Brighton, with good transport connections and a range of employment, it generates significant commuting in both directions.

Gatwick Airport is a major economic driver for the South East region, as well as West Sussex. Crawley has seen an influx of banking, financial, business and professional service companies in recent years. There has been a shift from direct dependence (airport type jobs) to indirect (business based) dependence on the Airport, in part at least because the airport transport hub offers excellent access to foreign markets and to central London. The airport remains critically important to the Diamond economy.

However congestion, shortage of affordable housing, and recruitment difficulties due to skills shortages threaten the Diamond’s position as an international business centre, in the face of rising international competition.

There is some polarisation in employment opportunities, ranging between low skill occupations such as baggage handling at the Airport and post graduate research level in the bio-medical technology sector, but with relatively limited job opportunities in the middle range. Reducing that disparity among communities and individuals in the Diamond by promoting more ambition and innovation may be the greatest challenge for the future. Local partners including district and borough councils and their LSPs are striving to create higher education provision in the Diamond, but this needs Government support and funding.

County-wide Issues:

Education and Training

Skill levels among young people and adults in some neighbourhoods with a high index of multiple deprivation are low, notably the percentage of young people without basic employability skills of 5 GCSEs at grades C+ or a Level 2. NEET figures generally are good, but there are high numbers in some areas, for example along the coastal strip. Overall attainment at age 16 and 19 is improving and there is a wider provision of type of course. However, rural transport issues can inhibit access to further education and training. Meanwhile, young people and adults who engage in higher education are more likely to leave the area and not return. Access to higher education is rising but still an issue, driven by aspiration and history as much as any genuine barriers.

Community Safety

Overall crime levels in the county are low and have been falling. Violent and acquisitive crimes are not rated as major issues, along with only moderate concerns about drug culture and prolific offenders. Yet youth re-offending and drug treatment both show levels of performance below national standards, partly as a result of the chronic underfunding of public services. Fear of crime remains relatively high with anti-social behaviour and alcohol-fuelled crime being a primary public concern. The rate of road injuries and deaths is above the national average and has not reduced as quickly as expected.

Health and Social Care

West Sussex has an older population than the national or regional average. In 2006 there were 24,400 people aged 85 or over; this represents 3.2% of the total population, compared to 2.1% nationally and 2.4% in the South East.

The 85+ age group is also the fastest rising age group in the population and this rapid growth and increasing frailty is a major challenge putting pressure on severely stretched health and social care services and carers within the community. Services must adapt and integrate to address these higher levels of demand and incidence of health and social care problems associated with ageing, frailty and dementia whilst promoting independence, choice and control by concentrating on outcomes for older people.

Overall West Sussex has generally good indicators of health, but inequalities exist between areas.

  • Life expectancy generally is increasing and is above national average, but is lower in some neighbourhoods. West Sussex has the greatest difference in life expectancy - the biggest gap between the worst and best areas - of any area of the south coast SHA. River Ward in Littlehampton has the lowest life expectancy in the South East.
  • Overall poverty is below national average, but nearly 60,000 people including over 18,000 children, are living in low income households.
  • Poverty among pensioners contributes to some public health concerns.

Rates of statutorily homeless households are lower than national average, as are rates of teenage pregnancy, levels of binge drinking, hospital admissions for alcohol specific conditions, and death rates from smoking - yet there are still significant populations in each of these categories. The increasing issues of alcohol misuse and obesity are both being tackled through new joint strategies.

The “Fit for the Future” review of health care provision has generated huge controversy about access to hospitals/acute care. At the same time there is commitment to invest more in prevention activity and integrated delivery of both health and social care support and services within local communities. The challenge is securing funding to support this.

Transport

There are complex commuting patterns into and out of the county and within it. About 300,000 people live and work in West Sussex. Inward commuting to the county is around 70,000 while 80,000 people travel out to work elsewhere. The impacts of this on the travel to work patterns are an important part of the overall transport issues for the county.

Congestion occurs in the coastal towns and in the Gatwick Diamond areas, especially at peak times, resulting in longer journey times and poorer bus punctuality. Across the county as a whole bus usage has increased in recent years but remains low, and travel to school by non-car modes is lower than the regional average. There is scope for a greater proportion of journeys to be made by public transport, cycling and walking. Growth in rail travel is now subject to capacity constraints on both the Brighton Mainline and Coastway, for which there are no significant solutions planned.

Housing

Housing is a controversial topic in West Sussex, affecting economic and social conditions in all areas, but with varying emphases in different areas.

  • Supply of new homes has been below the planned rates in several parts of the County as a result of the concerns about higher levels of house building being imposed without essential infrastructure.
  • At the same time there is general support for more affordable housing to be one of the highest priorities.
  • Special groups have particular needs. For young people leaving care, inability to find and afford a home makes the transition to adult life all the more difficult. Elderly people can need help to live independently and may have difficulty finding suitable accommodation.

Economy

In general terms the economy of West Sussex shows relatively low productivity, growth in employment, and earnings, except for the Gatwick Diamond. Recent evidence suggests GVA growth in West Sussex is the lowest in the South East.

Business formation and survival rates are low. Inward investment seems hard to stimulate (although there have been some notable successes). However this does not show markedly in numbers of unemployed, registered as on Job Seekers Allowance, which is only marginally higher than the regional average. Economic development and increased productivity and business performance are key objectives for the local economy.

Apart from Crawley, the West Sussex economy is based on large numbers of small businesses. A lack of investment in commercial premises over the last 25 years has created a situation where many older style units are now not suited to the business need for smaller modern flexible units. Some site owners see more potential in converting their properties to residential use as upgrade costs are not economically viable in current market conditions. This has led to a loss of existing employment space in some locations as local planning authorities are not able to resist the pressure to build more homes. Investment is also urgently required in new starter business units (with flexible rental terms) with larger 'move on' units being made available for these enterprises to grow.

There are some success stories to build on in re-vitalising town centres. Strong town economies can help address some of the issues of deprivation, crime, health, housing and employment referred to elsewhere in this narrative.

Job seekers with physical or mental health disadvantages face special difficulties: Incapacity Benefit rates are high in the county.

Environment

Performance on waste management is mostly good across the county. Fly-tipping has shown high overall rates in the past, but has been an area of pro-active effort in several places. Climate change issues need to be addressed: Resilience arrangements for extreme climatic events and flooding is needed everywhere, but especially in specific coastal and riverside areas. Life style and resource management changes will need to continue to be made to reduce water and energy use. Stabilising and then reducing the growth in the ecological footprint is a regional priority.

Quality of Life

West Sussex is a very popular, attractive place to live and work. The quality of life for the many is generally high. The county’s beautiful landscape, rich history and coast offer a range of cultural and leisure activities, of which Goodwood, Hickstead, Chichester Festival Theatre and K2 Leisure Centre, for instance, are nationally renowned. There is a strong and diverse cultural life at the community level, although a comparative lack of mid-scale community and cultural facilities. Between the nationally recognised and the community activity, there is a wealth of hidden assets that, once recognised, offer rewards to the more enquiring visitors and residents. The challenge is to ensure these benefits are open and enjoyed by all the county’s communities, who may not feel these are ‘for them’.

Themes for Action

There has been little opportunity to test the themes and priorities of the LAA with residents directly given the short timescales imposed on the process. However they are based on:

a) existing county, district and other strategies which have previously been the subject of public consultation;

b) surveys, eg the annual public satisfaction survey; and

c) the views of representative groups and organisations.

In the last major public survey in 2007, the communities of West Sussex most wanted to see improvements in:

Traffic congestion

Activities for teenagers

Health services

The level of crime

Affordable and decent housing

Road and pavement repairs

Public Transport

In its debates, the Public Service Board representatives thought the priority areas for action were:

Children and Health

Affordable housing

Deprivation

Skills

Transport

Crime

Based on these views and the analysis of the county’s needs, partners’ collective priorities for the LAA are:

d) to level up the life outcomes and experiences for those in rural and deprived communities in housing, crime, health and employment;

e) to increase the sustainable accessibility of jobs, education and essential services to all, particularly in rural areas and for those in deprived communities;

f) to improve the health, educational attainment and access to activities of children and younger people in all communities.

The West Sussex approach to improvement for all

Given the relative lack of Government funding and investment in West Sussex, it is essential that public services use their resources to maximum effect. This requires even closer partnership working and will be achieved best if they are used to provide the framework for communities and individuals, especially older people, to help themselves, and to support a thriving third sector of community and voluntary groups locally.

This will build on the success of current policies and projects, examples of which are:-

  • The national pilot for individual budgets, which aimed to improve the lives of older people and their carers by giving them access to a personalised budget based on need. Within this resource they have greater freedom to spend as they wish giving them more choice and control over their care. In practice this represents a huge cultural shift which considers overall funding based on needs, rather than rationing each service through tightly controlled eligibility criteria. The pilot has made a transformational shift away from an overly bureaucratic, menu-driven approach to services, to one where older people themselves are really empowered to design their support and purchase the services that they want. The learning from the pilot is informing the incremental roll-out of self directed support across all care groups and is contributing to making the vision of the Adults’ Services Transformation a reality. Together with people on the successful ‘In Control’ programme, over 200 individuals across the County now receive self directed care.
  • The County Local Committees’ devolution of decisions taken locally. Each of 14 CLCs has delegated powers and responsibilities, allowing local engagement with communities on decision making (for example Traffic Regulation Orders, speed limits and car parking zones, funding for community initiatives, appointments to important LEA School Governor positions). The CLCs also provide a vehicle for local strategic consultation, for example the recent PCT ‘Fit For the Future’ consultation and the Royal Mail Post Office closure programme consultation exercises.
  • A countywide Volunteer Support Service. This aims to support the aim of the Community Strategy to create a more connected and self-reliant community, which values and encourages active citizenship through voluntary activity from school age, through employment and beyond retirement. The Public Service Board has sought to establish a sustainable and affordable future for the service, to replace the fragility and service failures arising from over-dependence on short-term funding.
  • Crawley Fastway has increased bus use in the town by about 25% through a step-change in quality and this needs to be replicated elsewhere. We are looking at how this might be achieved in the coastal towns
  • Together, the eight local authorities, LSPs, sports, cultural, business, higher education and community interests are working to ensure the 2012 Games will bring maximum benefit to West Sussex including planning for a four-year celebration of local culture and sport to reflect the national Cultural Olympiad.
  • Support for changing life styles through tips in the Better Tomorrows Magazine, the real nappy initiative, the Green Club, increasing walking through the guided walks programme and walks festival, support for local food through the Food Festival and Taste Magazine, and guidance on water and energy saving.
  • Joint working to secure improved primary health care facilities in rural parts of Horsham District where partnerships between the District Council, the NHS and GP practices have secured sites and funding for new-build premises. These alliances have enabled best value capital development and given scope to deliver an increased range of health and social care services to local communities.

DESIGNATED TARGETS

National Indicator

No

National Indicators*

Baseline

LAA Designated Improvement

Targets

Statutory Partners who have signed-up to the target and any which are acting as lead partner/s (shown with a *)

     

08/09

09/10

10/11

 

NI 1

% of people who believe people from different backgrounds get on well together in their local area

To be set in Year 1 through Place Survey 2008

    Target to be set at level of statistically significant measurable increase on Place survey baseline, with option to review in 2009

All Borough and District Councils*; Sussex Police;

West Sussex County Council

NI 4

% of people who feel they can influence decisions in their locality

To be set in Year 1 through Place Survey 2008

    Target to be set at level of statistically significant measurable increase on Place survey baseline, with option to review in 2009

West Sussex County Council*; all Borough and District Councils;

Sussex Police; Sussex Police Authority; West Sussex PCT

NI 7

Environment for a thriving third sector

To be set in Year 1 through Survey 2008

    Target to be set at level of statistically significant measurable increase on survey baseline, with option to review in 2009

Compact Implementation Group*; all Borough and District Councils; Sussex Ambulance Service NHS Trust; Sussex Partnership Trust; Sussex Police;

West Sussex County Council; West Sussex PCT

NI 8

Adult participation in sport and active recreation

22.2%

24.2%

25.2%

26.2%

Sussex County Sports Partnership*; all Borough and District Councils; Sport England;

West Sussex County Council; West Sussex PCT

NI 17

Percentage of people who perceive a high level of anti-social

behaviour in their local area

25% (BVPI survey 2006/07)

22.5%

To be set in 2009 after the results of the Place Survey 2008 are available

West Sussex County Council*; all Borough and District Councils; Sussex Police; Sussex Police Authority;

Sussex Probation Service;

West Sussex PCT

NI 19

Rate of proven re-offending by young offenders

To be set in Year 1

To be set at first Refresh

Youth Offending Team, West Sussex County Council*; all Borough and District Councils; Sussex Police; Sussex Police Authority; Sussex Probation Service;

West Sussex PCT

NI 30

Re-offending rate of prolific and priority offenders (to be confirmed)

 

To be set at first Refresh

 

NI 32

Repeat incidents of domestic violence

To be set in Year 1

To be set at first Refresh

West Sussex County Council*; all Borough and District Councils; all NHS Hospital Trusts; Sussex Police; Sussex Police Authority; Sussex Probation Service;

West Sussex PCT

NI 39

Rate of Hospital Admissions per 100,000 for Alcohol Related Harm

1189

1308.92

1369.11

1429.29

West Sussex PCT*; all Borough and District Councils; all NHS Hospital Trusts; Sussex Police; Sussex Police Authority; Sussex Probation Service;

West Sussex County Council

NI 47

People killed or seriously injured in road traffic accidents

NB Data relates to calendar years

476

(2007)

436

(2008)

396

(2009)

358

(2010)

West Sussex County Council*; Highways Agency; Sussex Police; Sussex Police Authority

NI 51

Effectiveness of child and adolescent mental health (CAMHs) services

Not available

13

To be set when new outcome measure devised

West Sussex PCT*; West Sussex County Council*; Sussex Partnership Trust

NI 59

% of Initial assessments for children’s social care carried out within 7 working days of referral

       

West Sussex County Council*

NI 69

Children who have experienced bullying

To be set in Year 1 through TellUs Survey 2008

To be set in 2009 after the results of the TellUs Survey 2008 are available

West Sussex County Council*; Sussex Police

NI 79

Achievement of a Level 2 qualification by the age of 19

NB Relates to academic years

73.4%

(2005/06)

76%

79%

82%

Sussex Learning & Skills Council*; West Sussex County Council

NI 110

Young people’s participation in positive activities

To be set in Year 1 through TellUs Survey 2008

To be set in 2009 after the results of the TellUs Survey 2008 are available

West Sussex County Council*; Arts Council; all Borough & District Councils; Sport England

NI 117

16 to 18 year olds who are not in education, employment or training (NEET)

NB Relates to academic years

4.5%

3.9%

3.5%

3.1%

West Sussex County Council*; Sussex Learning & Skills Council

NI 120

All-age all cause mortality rate: male

       

West Sussex PCT*

All-age all cause mortality rate: female

       

NI 130

Social Care clients receiving Self Directed Support per 100,000 population

(!NB Baseline and targets quoted are actual numbers, not per 100,000 population)

700

1,600

2,800

4,000

West Sussex County Council*;

NI 134

The number of emergency bed days per head of weighted population

       

West Sussex PCT*; Royal West Sussex,

Surrey and Sussex Healthcare,

Worthing and Southlands Hospitals NHS Trusts; West Sussex County Council

NI 135

Carers receiving needs assessment or review and a specific carer’s service, or advice and information

21.8%

23%

24%

25%

West Sussex County Council*;

NI 142

Percentage of vulnerable people who are supported to maintain independent living

98%

98%

98%

98%

West Sussex County Council*; All Borough and District Councils; Sussex Partnership NHS Trust; Sussex Probation Service;

West Sussex PCT

NI 147

Care leavers in suitable accommodation

82.4%

85%

85%

90%

West Sussex County Council*; all Borough and District Councils

NI 150

Adults in contact with secondary mental health services in employment

To be set in Year 1

To be set at first Refresh

West Sussex County Council*; Sussex Partnership Trust; West Sussex PCT

NI 152

Working age people on out of work benefits

7.9%

7.7%

7.3%

6.9%

West Sussex County Council *; Job Centre Plus; all Borough and District Councils; SEEDA

NI 154

Net additional homes provided

2,349

2,900

3,050

3,205

All Borough & District Councils*

NI 155

Number of affordable homes delivered (gross)

735

745

561

241

All Borough and District Councils* and West Sussex County Council via the West Sussex Planning and Affordable Housing Group;

NI 158

% non-decent council homes

(Crawley Borough only)

       

Crawley Borough Council*

NI 162

Learners achieving an Entry Level 3 qualification in numeracy

825

850

885

925

Sussex Learning & Skills Council*

NI 164

Proportion of population aged 19-64 for males and 19-59 for females qualified to at least Level 3 or higher

DIUS data – annual population survey

Baseline of 52.3% with a CI of 2.6%

54.3%

+2 percentage points over baseline

57.5%

+5.2 percentage points over baseline

60%

+7.7 percentage points over baseline

Sussex Learning & Skills Council*

NI 175

Access to out-patients services in rural areas north of the Sussex Downs by public transport, walking and cycling

To be set in Year 1

To be set at first Refresh

West Sussex PCT*; West Sussex County Council

NI 186

Per capita reduction in CO2 emissions in the LA area

5536kt: 7.2 tonnes per capita

(2005)

To be set at first Refresh

2% over national target of 7.5%

All Borough and District Councils*; West Sussex County Council

NI 195

Improved street and environmental cleanliness (levels of litter, detritus, graffiti and fly posting)

       

All Borough and District Councils*; West Sussex County Council

NI 198

Children travelling to school – mode of transport usually used

70.25%

(Jan 2008)

71%

71.5%

72%

West Sussex County Council*

STATUTORY TARGETS

NI

2008 (2007/08 academic year)

2009 (2008/09 academic year)

2010 (2009/10 academic year)

2011 (2010/11 academic year)

NI 72 Achievement of at least 78 points across the Early Years Foundation Stage with at least 6 in each of the scales in Personal Social and Emotional Development and Communication, Language and Literacy

83.6

85.1

86.5

88.2

NI 73 Achievement at level 4 or above in both English and Maths at Key Stage 2 (Threshold)

80

81

82

83

NI 74 Achievement at level 5 or above in both English and Maths at Key Stage 3 (Threshold)

77

78

79

80

NI 75 Achievement of 5 or more A*-C grades at GCSE or equivalent including English and Maths (Threshold)

56

57

59

60

NI 83 Achievement at level 5 or above in Science at Key Stage 3

81

83

85

88

NI 87 Secondary school persistent absence rate

 

5.5

5.3

5.1

NI 92 Narrowing the gap between the lowest achieving 20% in the Early Years Foundation Stage Profile and the rest

18

17

16

15

NI 93 Progression by 2 levels in English between Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2

85

87

88

90

NI 94 Progression by 2 levels in Maths between Key Stage 1 and Key Stage 2

80

83

84

85

NI 95 Progression by 2 levels in English between Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 3

35

42

43

45

NI 96 Progression by 2 levels in Maths between Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 3

72

73

75

77

NI 97 Progression by 2 levels in English between Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4

67

68

70

72

NI 98 Progression by 2 levels in Maths between Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4

38

38

40

44

NI 99 Children in care reaching level 4 in English at Key Stage 2

41

61

56

58

NI 100 Children in care reaching level 4 in Maths at Key Stage 2

60

61

54

65

NI 101 Children in care achieving 5 A*-C GCSEs (or equivalent) at Key Stage 4 (including English and Maths)

30

31

35

37

LOCAL TARGET

Indicator

No

Indicator(s), including those from national indicator set (shown with a *)

Baseline

LAA Local Improvement

Target, not designated

Statutory Partners who have signed-up to the target and any which are acting as lead partner/s (shown with a *)

     

08/09

09/10

10/11

 

LI 1

Number of businesses

         

Related Documents

9 Jun 2008 | PDF version Black Minority Ethnic Housing Strategy

9 Jun 2008 | PDF version Cabinet Procedure Rules

9 Jun 2008 | PDF version Portfolio Briefing Priorities

9 Jun 2008 | PDF version Residential Environment Improvement Programme Review for Projects from 2009 onwards

9 Jun 2008 | PDF version West Sussex County Council Local Area Agreement (LAA2) 2008/11

9 Jun 2008 | PDF version West Sussex Health Overview and Scrutiny Committee

9 Jun 2008 | PDF version Minutes

25 Mar 2008 | PDF version Minutes


(01293) 438000 (01293) 511803 comments@crawley.gov.uk click to email us
Town Hall
The Boulevard
Crawley
West Sussex RH10 1UZ
Open Mon to Fri 8.30am-5pm

Contact Us

tel:
(01293) 438000

fax: (01293) 511803

email: click to email us

address:
Town Hall
The Boulevard
Crawley
West Sussex RH10 1UZ
Open Mon to Fri 8.30am-5pm

GovDelivery icon